Survival Tips

Signs and Symbols 101

for Train Commuters

by Anne Marielle Eugenio, September 21, 2018 9:44am

Art by Dani Elevazo

Survival Tips

Signs and Symbols 101 for Train Commuters

by Anne Marielle Eugenio, September 21, 2018 9:44am
Art by Dani Elevazo
 

Since we are all rushing to get on board the MRT or LRT, (especially during Monday morning rush hours), we often neglect the basic, yet very important, signs that we should be following as responsible train commuters.

As a refresher, here are some of our train’s signs and symbols for a more convenient journey

On The Station:

Don’t go beyond the yellow line.

Okay, so it may not look so yellow anymore, but that’s no reason to put your life at risk. These lines are here help your avoid from accidents such as this.

Don’t step on the yellow box

If you are waiting to get on board the train, fall in line following the arrows on the station platform pointing inward. The yellow box with arrows pointing outward should be kept clear for passengers alighting the train. Imagine if everyone follows this, there wouldn’t be any unnecessary push (and sometimes pulls) to get off and on the train. Please naman.

Keep left side (of escalators) open

This is usually seen on escalators. If you are not exactly in a hurry, keep right and keep the left side open for rushing passengers.

No Spitting

This should go without saying. Spitting is universally rude, not to mention, unhygienic and disgusting.

Exact Fare Only

One of the MRT ticketing windows has a sign saying "Exact Fare Only". This is a good lane to line up to especially if you’re in a hurry. Make sure to bring the exact amount as stated!

Beep Cards Only

If you are a single journey card user and about to exit the station, keep in mind that there are "express" aisles made for Beep Card holders. They are usually placed at the right most part of the station so don't get confused. Otherwise, rushing passengers might take it out on you.

“Priority” Signs

The first one or two train doors are only exclusive for pregnant women, parents with little children, differently abled, and senior citizens. They should also be prioritized for elevator rides.

Inside the train:

Do not lean on train doors

For those who ride the MRT daily, you would know that the leaning on train doors will cause them to open, which will interrupt train operations. So even though the car is crowded, try to stay away from the doors as possible to prevent any untoward incidents.

No Eating /Drinking /Smoking/Pets Allowed

All of these are to avoid distracting your fellow passengers. Who would want a smelly train car, right?

Priority Seats

Even though there are already designated areas for pregnant women, parents with children, differently abled, and senior citizens, they should be the priority when it comes to every seat on the train—or in any public establishment.

Any train rules we forgot to include? Let us know!

 

Is `Signs and Symbols 101 for Train Commuters´ helpful?  Y  N

Comments