What is Sustainable Fashion and How can Filipinos Take Part in the Movement

Shara Mae Balce
PUBLISHED December 6, 2018 12:04 pm | UPDATED December 14, 2018 07:18 am
Collage by Dani Elevazo

With the seasonal sales and bazaars, the odds of shopping without putting anything on a cart, especially during the holidays, is a billion to one.


And when it comes to clothing most especially, many of us are guilty of hoarding new pieces even if we don’t really need them yet. But did you know that the overconsumption of clothes has a negative impact on people and the environment?


The documentary True Cost brings in to light the concept of “sustainable fashion” by providing answers on what’s the real thing behind our clothing. From designing to production, every piece of clothing goes through a lot of processes before it hits the store racks. And the documentary ventures into the different effects of the garment industry on its workers and the environment.



What is Sustainable Fashion?


Sustainable Fashion is the manufacturing and producing of wearables while considering economic, environmental, and socio-economical aspects. It’s about conserving an ecological balance between the people and the environment to be able to lessen any unwanted results of the product’s life cycle.


A lot of garments takes about decades or more before it decomposes, especially those made from petroleum-based synthetics such as polyester and nylon which are composed of plastics. That’s why reusing or upcycling clothes is one way of practicing sustainable fashion efficiently.



“Today, both people and the environment suffer as a result of the way fashion is made, sourced and consumed.”- Fashion Revolution


How can we practice sustainable fashion?


The Fashion Revolution Philippines takes the spotlight on promoting global movement towards sustainable fashion on behalf of producers, designers, workers, makers, and consumers around the world. It aims a fashion revolution to stamp out unethical consumerism and irresponsible buying, which most of us are guilty of.


The group wants to share their stand and spread awareness on how sustainable fashion works in a globalized industry that values people and the planet—that includes the great hands behind what we wear. This is a call-to-action for everyone, who can be part of the revolution, not to remain surd and stunned on the unsettled issue of overconsumption and for brands to be transparent on where the products are made of, who made them, and what's the status of the people who made those.


“It’s so nice to see that Philippines is here, that’s a really big thing to have a developing country take part in Fashion Revolution. It’s a great testament to how we progress since Fashion Revolution has only been here two years and I’m really proud of its success and the community that it has built,” said Monica Vivar, founder and brand director of Denuo.


One thing to get started on practicing the sustainable fashion movement is to be inspired by these shops that were present during The Good Trade's zero-waste lawn party:



“Lumago Designs” produces handcrafted products made by women from Dumaguete City. They are committed to triple bottom-line sustainability: People, Planet, and Promise.


 



“Green Habit” promotes eco-friendliness through products that are empowered with earthly ideas.


 



“Karisma ni Maria” sells renewed stuff from recycled materials.


 



“Tala” supports the weaving communities of the Philippines Itneg Tribe.


 



“S|o Living” has sustainable products made by craftsmen from different regions in the country.



MAKE SMTHNG Week was an event that brought people together to gain first-hand experience of making more out of what they already own. In partnership with Sharvd and the Good Trade Ph, with talks from the Fashion Revolution team, the event kickstarts our 2019 early in inspiring us to be resourceful and creative with what we have. And eventually, sustainability in everything we have and do will become the new normal.




Fashion Revolution is one of the world’s largest fashion activism movement that started in 2013 and it has been gearing up with its global effort in the Philippines for two years.

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