Condition of Philippine corals is ‘generally’ improving—DENR

Shara Mae Balce
PUBLISHED December 1, 2017 03:30 pm | UPDATED December 1, 2017 03:41 pm

(Inside Manila) It can be seen how the Philippines is undeniably beautiful in every angle—atop of its mountains and deep down its blue seas.


Going beneath its marine environment, the Philippines is known for its species-rich coral reefs, which makes the archipelagic country continue its drive to conserve its diverse underwater ecosystems.


Officials of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) on Thursday, November 30, said that the condition of coral reefs in the country is generally improving from “poor” to “fair.”


DENR’s Biodiversity Management Bureau (BMB) ecosystems management specialist Carina Manlapaz cited the initial data from the 2017 State of Coast report which showed that only 18% of the country’s coral reefs are in poor condition.


Manlapaz added that 46.6% of Philippine corals are reported to be in “fair” condition. This reveals that the state of the coral reefs are improving.


Even though only 4% of the country’s corals have “excellent” condition, the same report showed that 31% are reported “good.”


Coral Triangle


Together with other member countries of the Coral Triangle Initiative on Coral Reefs, Fisheries and Food Security (CTI-CFF), the Philippines is moving towards conserving the biodiversity-rich region, aiming to keep the region as a "sustainable mega-resource."


The Philippines is part of the coral triangle region, which has more fish species and corals than other marine environment.


The country has been declared as well as the world’s “center of marine biodiversity,” according to a report of World Bank. Its corals, tropical reefs, are considered as the richest marine ecosystems on Earth.

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