Real Talk

Why Are Millennials Obsessing

Over Indoor Plants?

by Pearl Bacasmas, January 30, 2019 8:00pm

When did #plantmum and #plantlady become a thing in social media? Let’s face it our obsession with plants has grown.

Real Talk

Why Are Millennials Obsessing Over Indoor Plants?

by Pearl Bacasmas, January 30, 2019 8:00pm
When did #plantmum and #plantlady become a thing in social media? Let’s face it our obsession with plants has grown.
 

It starts with an easy one at first, a little succulent. We’ll watch it grow, and we’ll feel pride or accomplished; a sense of responsibility for another living thing. Next thing we know, we’re living in an urban jungle.

 
 
 
 
 
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Plants are safe; just the right level of responsibility we can handle. It requires less work. We can take all the credit once it blooms and when it dies, we can just compost it and move on (okay, maybe we grieve a little). And to state the obvious, it’s less stressful and cost-effective compared to having a fur baby or a real baby even. Plus, the growing interest in wellness culture is proof greens are good for us. The sight of greenery reduces our stress, and even promotes productivity. There’s also a study that shows an increase in creativity with people who have plants in their work area.

 
 
 
 
 
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Millennials crave nature, an escape from the stress of city living

This inclination towards plants is not unique to our generation, but compared to the older generation, we find a struggle in owning an ideal home with a garden despite our love for "being around nature." We are delusional to think a statement house plant like a Monstera Deliciosa or a Philodendron Grazielae can transform our space into a less depressing state. It makes sense because growing up, we did a lot of outdoor activities. The sad fact is now we’re always our phones or computers, so the only way to get a hold of the great outdoors is to bring it inside our house.

Beyond the nostalgia, there’s also a basic human need to care for something outside ourselves—in a time where making major life choices have to come later. We have embraced plant parenthood; that’s not to say we are abandoning marriage and kids all together, we’re taking our sweet time. It makes us feel good to nurture, to watch something grow and thrive. And it goes past our willingness to spend some "green" to create the most ~aesthetic~ ‘gram-worthy plantscapes.

“We are delusional to think a statement house plant like a Monstera Deliciosa or a Philodendron Grazielae can transform our space into a less depressing state.”

The routine we form with our plants: watering, pruning and checking for pests (or even talking to them) is an exercise in mindfulness—these little things that depend on us for life help and inspire us to take care of ourselves. It forces us to slow down, put our phones down and be present on how the great existential mysteries of photosynthesis takes place in an insentient object. Owning a plant is not just about decor. It’s about taking care of another living thing—may it be a trial version for our future, at least it’s a good start.

It’s not a sick obsession for us to have. Houseplants are neutral, apolitical and downright peaceful, and we all need more of that in our busy lives.

New to the world of indoor gardening? We’ve got you covered.

 

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