Guides

We Bet You Didn’t

Know These Everyday Words

Are Actually Spanish

by Anne Marielle Eugenio, February 28, 2020 5:27pm

Art by Ahl Mirambel

Guides

We Bet You Didn’t Know These Everyday Words Are Actually Spanish

by Anne Marielle Eugenio, February 28, 2020 5:27pm
Art by Ahl Mirambel
 

For more than 300 years, we were under the Spanish rule and it’s no surprise many of our modern-day practices were influenced from them—including the way we speak and how we choose our words. A part of the everyday Filipino words we use came from the Spanish language. Here are a few of them to refresh your memory.

Imbes

We often hear imbes in daily conversations without knowing that it came from the Spanish words en vez meaning “instead of."

e.g.: Imbes na bigyan mo ako ng matinong rason, ang dahilan mo sa akin ‘yang pagiging fire sign mo.

via GIPHY

Kaso

Kaso or caso is a Spanish word for subalit but we use it often—in our sentences, messages, and even to reason out to our bosses during work.

Eg: Maaga sana ako eh kaso nag-break down ‘yung MRT.


via GIPHY

Kumusta

This word came from the Spanish phrase como esta meaning how are you. And yes, it’s kumusta, not kamusta.

via GIPHY

Maski

Maski sounds very Filipino but it’s another word has Spanish origins. It came from the words masque which means “more than.” In Filipino, it is equivalent to kahit

Eg: Maski nga akong hindi Army, kilala ko si RM.


via GIPHY

Pero

We have a lot of reasons, so we use a lot of pero or but as we converse with others. Pero, did you know that pero is actually the Spanish equivalent for ngunit?


via GIPHY

Puwera

Puwera came from the word fuera, which is a conditional conjunction. It is roughly translated as unless.

via GIPHY

e.g: Hindi ako makakasama sa overnight puwera na lang kung ikaw magpapaalam kay Mama.

Regardless if the words came from Spain or our native dialects, these words now make up our current lingos. Our language is not just used for communication but also shows the rich culture and influence of a certain country. 

 

Is `We Bet You Didn’t Know These Everyday Words Are Actually Spanish´ helpful?  Y  N

Comments